Lake Placid 1932

Lake Placid 1932

The small village of Lake Placid in upstate New York beat out several other American towns as well as Montreal for the right to host the 1932 Olympic Winter Games. Canada’s seven total medals placed the country behind only the United States and Norway and was a national Winter Olympic record that went unmatched until 1992.

Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936

Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936

After Berlin was awarded the 1936 Olympic Games, Germany exercised its right to also host the 1936 Olympic Winter Games, choosing the Bavarian resort of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, an amalgamation of two towns on either side of the River Partnach. Canada’s only medal once again came in ice hockey, but for the first time it wasn’t gold.

St. Moritz 1948

St. Moritz 1948

After World War II forced the cancellation of the 1940 and 1944 Olympic Winter Games, scheduled for Sapporo and Cortina d’Ampezzo respectively, the first Olympic Winter Games in 12 years took place in St. Moritz. For the first time in its Winter Olympic history, Canada won more than one gold medal.

Oslo 1952

Oslo 1952

These were the first edition of the Olympic Winter Games to be held in Scandinavia, the birthplace of numerous winter sport disciplines. The occasion was marked by the lighting of the Olympic flame in the hearth of the home of Sondre Norheim, the pioneer of modern skiing.

Cortina d’Ampezzo 1956

Cortina d’Ampezzo 1956

Four years before hosting the summer Olympic Games in Rome, Italy welcomed the world’s best winter athletes to Cortina d’Ampezzo, a resort in the Dolomites. These were the first Olympic Winter Games to include athletes from the Soviet Union, who were housed separately from the other delegations. It was the Soviets who brought an end to Canada’s ice hockey dominance.

Squaw Valley 1960

Squaw Valley 1960

When Squaw Valley won the right to host the 1960 Olympic Winter Games, the future ski resort was little more than a hotel. Canada enjoyed its most successful Olympic Winter Games since 1932, winning four medals, including two gold.

Innsbruck 1964

Innsbruck 1964

After losing a close race to host the 1960 Olympic Winter Games, Innsbruck was a near-unanimous selection for 1964, winning the vote 49-9 over Calgary. It was in Innsbruck that Canada competed in Olympic bobsleigh for the first time and delivered what has been called the biggest upset in Olympic bobsleigh history.

Grenoble 1968

Grenoble 1968

Grenoble won the right to host the 1968 Olympic Winter Games in a close vote, 27-24, over Calgary. Canada’s star of the Games was alpine skier Nancy Greene, who in her third Olympic appearance won gold in the giant slalom and silver in the slalom.

Top Team Canada Fans of the Week

Clay Naslund

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 472794 points
  • Earned this week: 5990 points

Judy Naslund

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 291820 points
  • Earned this week: 5905 points

Al Redpath

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 501018 points
  • Earned this week: 5860 points

Kerri McGregor

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 482283 points
  • Earned this week: 5425 points

Ivy Tennis

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 309912 points
  • Earned this week: 2680 points

Adam Kohn

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 165820 points
  • Earned this week: 2045 points

jasper fleming

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 26608 points
  • Earned this week: 1819 points

Ryan White

Current Level

Legend

  • Total: 63935 points
  • Earned this week: 1720 points

Website by zync.ca | Programmed by Trew Knowledge | Powered by WordPress.com VIP