As the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games come to a close, it’s worth considering how many memorable moments there were for Canada.

Not only have the Games made an indelible mark on the lives of the athletes and everyone who helped them get there, they’ve also provided some special moments that will live on in the minds of Canadians for years to come.

And while no list could fully capture all the excitement of PyeongChang 2018, let’s take a look at some of the top moments for Team Canada:

Team Canada athletes enter the PyeongChang Olympic stadium at the Opening Ceremony of the to the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, South Korea (Photo by Vincent Ethier/COC)

Tessa & Scott, Part 1

The Opening Ceremony is a highlight of any Games, as our athletes get to bask in the excitement of reaching the pinnacle of competition in their chosen events. The smiles on the faces of Canada’s athletes—led into the event by flag bearers Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir—gave us all a sense of awe about what was to come.

Kaitlyn Lawes and John Morris of Canada compete during the Curling Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Game against Switzerland at the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Curling Centre on February 13, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Vincent Ethier/COC)

Mixed Magic

No one was quite sure what to expect from mixed doubles curling, a new Olympic event this year. But Canadians Kaitlyn Lawes and John Morris claimed the gold medal, prompting Morris to spontaneously and jubilantly hoist his partner into the air in celebration.

Team Canada’s Alex Gough celebrates winning Bronze in Ladies Single Luge at the Alpensia Sliding Centre, in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Tuesday, February 12, 2018. The medal marked Team Canada’s first even luge medal in history. (Photo/David Jackson)

Lugers Are Winners

Winning your first Olympic medal is great; winning your country’s first-ever Olympic medal in a sport is even greater. Canada hadn’t won a medal in luge until Alex Gough came through with a bronze in the women’s singles event. Then, a couple of days later, she helped Canada claim silver in the team relay.

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada win Gold in the Figure Skating Ice Dance Free Program at the Gangneung Ice Arena during the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang, South Korea on February 20, 2018. (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/COC)

Tessa & Scott, Part 2

It’s surprising that the surface at the Gangneung Ice Arena remained frozen, given how scorching the ice dance duo were during a performance that enthralled audiences worldwide—and won them a gold medal.

Canada’s Kelsey Serwa and Brittany Phelan celebrate their gold and silver medals during a medal presentation ceremony at the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games in Korea, Friday, February 23, 2018. Also pictured is bronze medalist Fanny Smith of Switzerland.
(THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO – COC Ð David Jackson)

The Power of Friendship

For the last three years, ski cross racers and best friends Kelsey Serwa and Brittany Phelan have done everything together. That continued at PyeongChang, when they came down the hill together in the big final to win the gold (Serwa) and silver (Phelan).

Tessa & Scott, Part 3

In an outburst that had millions of Canadians empathetically nodding their heads, Moir decided to, ahem, let his feelings known from the crowd during the women’s hockey gold-medal game between Canada and the U.S.

While figure skating teammate Patrick Chan looked on with a worried expression from the seat next to Moir, a nation wondered: where’s Tessa? Oh, she was watching:

They’re not Canada’s sweethearts for nothing.

Canada forward Melodie Daoust (15) tries to get the puck pass United States goaltender Madeline Rooney (35) during the Ice Hockey Women Play-offs Finals between Canada and USA at the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Hockey Centre on February 22, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea (Photo by Vincent Ethier/COC)

Daoust’s Dangle

The women’s hockey final was another classic between the cross-border rivals, even if Canada didn’t get the result they were hoping for (losing 3-2 in a shootout). That shouldn’t take away from one of the nicest Olympic goals we’ve ever seen, courtesy of Canadian forward Melodie Daoust in the shootout.

Kaetlyn Osmond wins bronze in the Ladies Single Free Skating at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 23, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea (Photo by Vincent Ethier/COC)

Hitting New Heights

Kaetlyn Osmond had two Olympic medals to her name (in the team event at Sochi 2014 and PyeongChang 2018) before the women’s singles event. But her bronze medal performance was special not just because it was her first individual medal, but because it was Canada’s 27th of these Games, a new national record.

Alex Harvey of Canada competes in the Men’s 50km Mass Start Classic Race at the Alpensia Cross-Country Skiing Centre during the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang, South Korea on February 24, 2018. (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/COC)

Harvey the Wonder Skiier

In his third and final Olympics, cross-country skier Alex Harvey left absolutely everything out there, finishing eighth in the 30km skiathlon, seventh in the 15km freestyle and an agonizing fourth in the grueling 50km classical race. Medal or not, his competitive spirit will live on beyond PyeongChang.

Kim Boutin finish 2nd in at the Short Track Speed Skating -Women’s 1000m Final at the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 22, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea (Photo by Vincent Ethier/COC)

Boutin On A Show

Short track speed skater Kim Boutin was Canada’s only triple medalist of these Games, providing numerous memorable moments on her own. For that, she earned the right to carry Canada’s flag at the Closing Ceremony.