Biography:

Walter Ewing was one of Canada’s greatest sport shooters prior to World War II. Despite having to adjust to a more difficult style of shooting at London 1908 (the British rules for the sport), and after some controversy after the first day of trap shooting, Ewing had an opportunity to take a reshoot on day two of competition. He scored 27 points taking the lead which he never relinquished through all three stages of the competition. The most consistent competitor at London 1908, Ewing had a total score of 72 points out of 80 for the three-day event, winning the gold medal, 12 points more than his Canadian teammate George Beattie who won the silver. Using an American Lefever gun with Winchester factory-loaded Leader shells, not only did Ewing capture the Olympic gold medal, he was awarded the Lord Westbury’s Cup, presented to the individual clay trap shooting winner. In the men’s trap team event, Canada finished second behind Great Britain I by only two clays, 407-405, and Ewing captured his second medal of the Games, a silver.

Ewing received little national attention in his brief shooting career. He was Canadian champion in the individual trap in 1910 and 1911, and the two and five man team trap in 1910. In 1912, Ewing turned down the opportunity to defend his national and Olympic titles and retired.

Ewing was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame in 1955 and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame in 1958.